Parts of the UK were treated to around 15,000 almighty lightning strikes in just four hours on Saturday night (May 26).

One weather expert branded it the ‘mother of all thunderstorms’ as it brought torrential rain along with it.

And if you missed it, don’t you worry, because people were on hand to take photos of the spectacle.

Tomasz Schafernaker

@Schafernaker

Mother of all now over London. Oh boy! This UTTERLY INSANE. I’ve never seen a storm with such frequent lightning in my life I don’t think. Mostly sheet lightning and not too loud but flashes are spectacular.

BBC weatherman Tomasz Schafernaker tweeted:

Mother of all thunderstorms now over London. Oh boy! This UTTERLY INSANE. I’ve never seen a storm with such frequent lightning in my life I don’t think. Mostly sheet lightning and not too loud but flashes are spectacular. [sic]

A yellow weather warning has now been issued for parts of the UK on Bank Holiday Monday. Oh good.

Gemma Plumb, a forecaster from BBC Weather, said ‘as the storms push northwards’ across England throughout Sunday (May 27), ‘more are making their way up over the English Channel’.

The weather warning for rain is in force until 6am on Monday (May 28) and it covers ‘all of Wales as well as southern and central England’, according to the Met Office.

Unfortunately this means there’s a potential for ‘quick’ flooding.

Here are just a few of the amazing images and videos captured:

Andrew Lanxon Hoyle

@Batteryhq

The lighting storm over London right now is utterly INTENSE

The Supercar Lifestyle@Supercar_Snaps

Without a doubt, the most furious storm over London I’ve EVER witnessed!!! AMAZING!!!

Tim Cornbill@timcornbill

Who got woken up by this little lot over night??

This is a combo of 8 shots of the lightning over Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham, taken at around 3am (Sorry it’s through a wet window!)

Click for full view

Nitai Levi@NitaiLevi

So I got this picture of the lightning over South West London and jumped for joy

According to Sky News, the London Fire Brigade received ‘more than 500 weather-related calls’, which they said were mostly of reports of flooding.

Flights from Stansted Airport were disrupted after the fuelling system was ‘damaged by a lightning strike’.

Stansted Airport said in a statement:

Due to an earlier lightning strike, the aircraft fuelling system was unavailable for a period this morning. Engineers have been on site and have now restored the system, however flights may still be subject to diversion, delay or cancellation.

We apologise for the inconvenience and advise all passengers to check with their airlines for their latest flight updates.

Some people have been waking up to the news having missed the whole thing.

One tweeted:

Apparently the was a huge storm last night. Multiple lightning strikes, house-shaking thunder, torrential rain – I slept through it all. That’s my superpower.

Apparently the was a huge storm last night. Multiple lightning strikes, house-shaking thunder, torrential rain – I slept through it all. That’s my superpower.

Here in the UK we don’t get the most extreme weather, thankfully.

Some countries have to contend with hurricanes and tornados, then there are earthquakes and almighty tropical storms.

Check out some of these:

According to USA Today, North America has the ‘world’s wildest weather extremes’

Meteorologist and author Robert Henson of Boulder, said:

You’d be hard-pressed to find another patch of land on Earth the size of the USA that boasts such a variety of such intensely extreme weather inside its borders.

Sean Potter, a meteorologist and weather historian in New York City added:

We get more high-impact weather than any other country on the planet.

The US is uniquely situated in the mid-latitudes — about halfway between the equator and the North Pole — and between two oceans.

The contrast of cold, dry, Arctic air from Canada and warm, moist, tropical air from the Gulf of Mexico, Pacific and Atlantic help fuel the massive storms that move across the country year-round, bringing everything from blizzards to heavy rain and thunderstorms, depending on the time of year.

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